Why Try Natural Sleep Supplements?

By | November 17, 2018

natural sleep supplements

Natural sleep supplements promote rest without the potential side effects of prescription sleep aids.

Sleep is one of the most foundational aspects of health and wellness. However, each year between 50 – 70 million Americans report struggling with sleep issues. When you have a hard time getting to sleep and staying that way, nighttime can feel like an uphill climb rather than a peaceful reset. Thankfully, there are many natural ways to improve your sleep quality. However, if you suspect serious sleep disorders, it is best to consult with your healthcare provider first (who may order a sleep study to rule out anything serious).

For those of us with mild sleep struggles, however, natural sleep supplements may be the answer to achieving deeper rest without the potential side effects of prescription sleep aids. Keep reading to learn more about natural sleep supplements, and why they may be the best choice for you.

6 Natural Sleep Supplements

Melatonin

Melatonin is a hormone naturally produced by your body that can help you transition from wakefulness to sleep. Some users find that taking melatonin as part of their bedtime routine helps them fall asleep quicker. Research shows it be especially helpful when your sleep schedule is off kilter due to jet lag or shifting work schedules. It also has potential for helping to alleviate general insomnia, but studies are ongoing.

Check out Kavinace products from Neuroscience to see if melatonin sleep supplements are right for you.

California Poppy

Supplements which contain California poppy extract have been trusted for years to help users achieve more restful sleep. Unlike the opium poppy, this plant contains no opiates and is non-addictive. Studies show that this herb may help induce sleep due to the presence of the alkaloids protopine and allocryptopine.

Try California Poppy Extract from Gaia Herbs in a warm bedtime tea and see if this is the natural solution you’ve been looking for.

Valerian Root

Valerian root comes from a tall, flowering, grassy plant and has been historically used for years to help treat anxiety and insomnia. Research shows that 80% of participants given valerian root fell asleep faster and reported better quality sleep.

Purchase Valerian Root from Gaia Herbs to try this type of dietary supplement for yourself.

Magnesium

Magnesium is an incredibly common and essential mineral, used in over 600 processes in the human body including brain, bone, and heart function. Magnesium supplements taken before bed can help you shut down for the night, relaxing your body and brain in preparation for a good night’s sleep.

Incorporate magnesium into your supplement routine with Magnesium Citrate/Malate supplements from Pure Encapsulations. If you’re not fond of taking vitamins in pill form, try the Natural Calm Raspberry Lemon drink mix magnesium powder by Natural Vitality, also available in other flavors.

Glycine

Glycine is a key amino acid used throughout the body which, when taken in supplement form, may help you achieve more restful sleep. Glycine affects the central nervous system and neurotransmitters, meaning it may help your brain shut down at bedtime.

Want to try Glycine? Check out Glycine from Pure Encapsulations.

Lavender

A common flower and essential oil, lavender is wildly well known for assisting in relaxation and rest. It can be inhaled at bedtime through a pillow spray, taken in the form of a warm tea, or ingested in supplement form.

Try Sleep Essence from Flora, which contains a soothing blend of lavender, passionflower, chamomile, and lemon balm to help you unwind.

Do you use natural sleep supplements to achieve a better night of rest? Share your experiences in the comments section below.

About Theresa Groskopp, CN

Certified Nutritionist in Appleton, Wisconsin, Founder of Natural Healthy Concepts. Natural health and nutrition advocate. Enjoys gardening, biking, fitness, boating, animals (especially cats), and cooking. Theresa Groskopp

Healthy Concepts with a Nutrition Bias